Peroxynitrite, the villain of Multiple Sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease.

I’m in an MS research moment right now, started by the ‘caffeine may help MS’ news item. For those who might be interested, the real villain in MS, and apparently Alzheimers too, is peroxynitrite, a very toxic free radical that causes damage to cells, and fatty central nervous system cells in particular.

A lot of the therapies being studied for MS at the moment involve involve powerful anti oxidants like the uric acid pre-cursor inosine, alpha lipoic acid, and  procyanidins from grapeseed oil. It would explain why some of the dietary therapies for MS have worked in the past. Is this the beginning of a way to fight both MS and Alzheimer’s?

The first cells are normal, the second damaged by peroxynitrite, the third damaged cells treated with melatonin to repair them
Peroxynitrite: biochemistry, pathophysiology and development of therapeutics
Peroxynitrite Mediates Retinal Neurodegeneration by Inhibiting Nerve Growth Factor Survival Signaling in Experimental and Human Diabetes

Peroxynitrite-induced membrane lipid peroxidation: the cytotoxic potential of superoxide

Procyanidins from grape seeds protect endothelial cells from peroxynitrite damage and enhance endothelium-dependent relaxation in human artery: new evidences for cardio-protection

Hydrogen Peroxide– and Peroxynitrite-Induced Mitochondrial DNA Damage and Dysfunction in Vascular Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cells

Widespread Peroxynitrite-Mediated Damage in Alzheimer’s Disease

A Peroxynitrite-Dependent Pathway Is Responsible for Blood-Brain Barrier Permeability Changes during a Central Nervous System Inflammatory Response

Uric acid, a peroxynitrite scavenger, inhibits CNS inflammation, blood-CNS barrier permeability

Evidence of neuronal oxidative damage in Alzheimer’s disease

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